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How the raw values of Int-based enums get incremented

Published on 11 Aug 2020
Basics article available: Enums

By default, the raw values for an enum backed by Int (or any other numeric) start at zero, and then get incremented by one for each case that the enum contains. For example, here we’ve defined an Int-based enum that contains layer indexes for a drawing application, which has the following raw values:

enum LayerIndex: Int {
    case shapes // 0
    case images // 1
    case text // 2
    case overlays // 3
}

While the above is certainly a very reasonable default, what if we’d like to start our indexes at a number other than zero? For example, our drawing engine might be treating zero indexes in some special way, or we might want to make our code compatible with another system that uses different numeric conventions.

The good news is that all that we have to do to make that happen, while still enabling the compiler to auto-increment our raw values, is to give our first case a custom value that we’d like to start at — like 1 for instance:

enum LayerIndex: Int {
    case shapes = 1 // 1
    case images // 2
    case text // 3
    case overlays // 4
}

The cool thing is that we can keep overriding the raw values for specific cases, and the auto-incrementing process will be adjusted accordingly:

enum LayerIndex: Int {
    case shapes = 1 // 1
    case images // 2
    case text = 9 // 9
    case overlays // 10
}

We could, of course, also assign completely custom raw values to every single case, but that’s often harder to maintain — so it’s really neat that we’re still able to take full advantage of the compiler’s auto-incrementing mechanism, even if we want to tweak just a few of our raw values.

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